This summer I was driving my daughter to camp in Southeast Dallas. Nearing our destination, we were stopped at a red light where there happened to be an AT&T truck with quite a bit of equipment outside of it blocking a small portion of the intersection.  What we didn’t see, however, was anyone “manning” the vehicle or the equipment.  A short time later, my daughter saw a technician rising from the manhole.  Her first response was one of fear, “I wonder if he’s afraid to go down there; I would be,” she said.  I told my daughter that although that’s his job, I was quite certain that upon his first time entering, he may have experienced some feelings of anxiety or fear, but you move forward in spite of it to get the job done.

I then began to think about every “new” adventure in my life and the fear that almost always gripped me. Leaving my parents’ home to go off to college; leaving college to move to Los Angeles; meeting, marrying and divorcing my ex-husband; moving to New York, meeting, dating and losing what I thought was love — first the Italian and then the Armenian — and most of this occurred before I turned twenty-eight.  I recall one situation in particular; the fear was so overwhelming that I developed an intestinal disorder, not realizing that I had disconnected so much from my feelings that it took a toll on me physically.  I was doubled over in pain.  I eventually realized the source of my problem had originated with my thoughts and I needed to get control of the mind if I wanted to regain control of what was manifesting in and through my body.  You see, unknowingly I had allowed fear to control my life.

Scripture references at least 365 times to either fear not, or don’t be afraid. Mark 5:35-36 is one such passage.  While Jesus was still speaking, some men came from the house of Jairus, the synagogue ruler.  “Your daughter is dead,” they said. “Why bother the teacher anymore?”  Ignoring what they said, Jesus told the synagogue ruler, “Don’t be afraid; just believe.”

Why did Jesus tell the synagogue ruler not to be afraid; he could simply have told him to believe? The reason he told him to not be afraid was because fear brings doubt, and doubt kills faith. God acts according to our faith.  How many times have you received an inspiring thought, belief or idea and then shared it with someone, only for them to speak from a place of fear (all the what if’s that can go wrong)?  Then, if we’re not careful, we allow doubt to creep in, so much so that it’s all but diminished our spirits and drained our energy!  We have to be mindful of the fact that we simply cannot share everything with everyone.  Some ideas have to be carefully guarded; God has entrusted you to bring it to completion.  Too often many ideas are aborted before they take root in our hearts and are never birthed because we’ve allowed words of doubt to have a greater impact than the thoughts and vision of God.

You were birthed WITH purpose and you’ve been entrusted with an assignment to execute.  When you’ve been called to do what you think is outside your capabilities, fear will come knocking, don’t give in to the trembling.  We have to learn to trust in order to achieve the triumph.  You are already equipped to get the job done.  No matter how dark or intimidating the hole appears, the mission is not only possible, it’s already done.  Don’t be afraid, manifest.  Go in and get the job done! manhole

Belinda Powell© November 2, 2016

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *